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Miley Cyrus Tickets

Miley Cyrus
Sprint Center
Kansas City, MO
Tuesday
4/15/2014
7:00 PM
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Tickets

We have tickets now. Some venues may have Meet & Greet Tickets, VIP Packages &/or Fan Packages available. Don't wait for "official" presale ticket or onsale ticket dates. Get the best concert tickets now!... while you still can.

Use the table below to find other tour dates & cities that Miley Cyrus will be playing in.


NoFeeConcertTickets.com has a wide variety of tickets available for all North American venues of Miley Cyrus's "Bangerz" tour. Tickets can include Presale tickets & all seating options available at each venue. Seating can include Pit Tickets, VIP Field Tickets, Floor tickets, Mezzanine Tickets, VIP Boxes, Balcony Tickets & Orchestra seats as well as Lawn & General Admission Tickets.

Don't want to miss Miley Cyrus in concert? See Miley Cyrus in concert by using the link below for an updated tour schedule. Miley Cyrus may add more dates to the tour in the future:

Updated Miley Cyrus 2014 "Bangerz" Tour Dates

Miley CyrusOracle Arena
Oakland, CA
Monday
2/24/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusSAP Center
San Jose, CA
Tuesday
2/25/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusUS Airways Center
Phoenix, AZ
Thursday
2/27/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusMGM Grand Garden Arena
Las Vegas, NV
Saturday
3/1/2014
8:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusPepsi Center - Denver
Denver, CO
Tuesday
3/4/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusCenturyLink Center Omaha
Omaha, NE
Thursday
3/6/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAllstate Arena
Rosemont, IL
Friday
3/7/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusBMO Harris Bradley Center
Milwaukee, WI
Sunday
3/9/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusXcel Energy Center
Saint Paul, MN
Monday
3/10/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAmerican Airlines Center
Dallas, TX
Wednesday
3/12/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusBank Of Oklahoma Center
Tulsa, OK
Thursday
3/13/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAT&T Center
San Antonio, TX
Saturday
3/15/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusToyota Center - TX
Houston, TX
Sunday
3/16/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusNew Orleans Arena
New Orleans, LA
Tuesday
3/18/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusTampa Bay Times Forum
Tampa, FL
Thursday
3/20/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAmerican Airlines Arena
Miami, FL
Saturday
3/22/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAmway Center
Orlando, FL
Monday
3/24/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusPhilips Arena
Atlanta, GA
Tuesday
3/25/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusCentre Bell
Montreal, Canada
Saturday
3/29/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusAir Canada Centre
Toronto, Canada
Monday
3/31/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusTD Garden (Fleet Center)
Boston, MA
Wednesday
4/2/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusIzod Center
East Rutherford, NJ
Thursday
4/3/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusBarclays Center
Brooklyn, NY
Saturday
4/5/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusTime Warner Cable Arena
Charlotte, NC
Monday
4/7/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusPNC Arena (Formerly RBC Center)
Raleigh, NC
Tuesday
4/8/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusVerizon Center - DC
Washington, DC
Thursday
4/10/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusPalace Of Auburn Hills
Auburn Hills, MI
Saturday
4/12/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusSchottenstein Center
Columbus, OH
Sunday
4/13/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusSprint Center
Kansas City, MO
Tuesday
4/15/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusScottrade Center
Saint Louis, MO
Wednesday
4/16/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusBridgestone Arena (Formerly Sommet Center)
Nashville, TN
Friday
4/18/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusKFC Yum! Center
Louisville, KY
Saturday
4/19/2014
7:30 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusWells Fargo Center - PA
Philadelphia, PA
Tuesday
4/22/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets

Miley CyrusNassau Coliseum
Uniondale, NY
Thursday
4/24/2014
7:00 PM
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tickets









First Nations peoples had settled and established trade routes across what is now Canada by 500 BCE–1,000 CE. Communities developed each with its own culture, customs, and character.[78] In the northwest were the Athapaskan, Slavey, Dogrib, Tutchone, and Tlingit. Along the Pacific coast were the Tsimshian; Haida; Salish; Kwakiutl; Nootka; Nisga'a; Senakw and Gitxsan. In the plains were the Blackfoot; Káínawa; Sarcee and Peigan. In the northern woodlands were the Cree and Chipewyan. Around the Great Lakes were the Anishinaabe; Algonquin; Míkmaq; Iroquois and Huron. Along the Atlantic coast were the Beothuk, Maliseet, Innu, Abenaki and Mi'kmaq.Many Canadian Aboriginal civilizations established characteristics and hallmarks that included permanent or urban settlements, agriculture, civic and monumental architecture, and complex societal hierarchies.[79] These civilizations had evolved and changed by the time of the first permanent European arrivals (c. late 15th–early 16th centuries), and have been brought forward through archaeological investigations.[80]There are indications of contact made before Christopher Columbus between the first peoples and those from other continents. Aboriginal people in Canada interacted with Europeans around 1000 CE, but prolonged contact came after Europeans established permanent settlements in the 17th and 18th centuries.[81] In Columbus' time there was speculation that other Europeans had made the trip in ancient or contemporary times; Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo y Valdés records this in his General y natural historia de las Indias of 1526, which includes biographical information on Columbus.[82] European written accounts generally recorded friendliness of the First Nations, who profited in trade with Europeans.[81] Such trade generally strengthened the more organized political entities such as the Iroquois Confederation.[83] Throughout the 16th century, European fleets made almost annual visits to the eastern shores of Canada to cultivate the fishing opportunities. A sideline industry emerged in the un-organized traffic of furs overseen by the Indian Department.[84]Prominent First Nations people include Joe Capilano, who met with King of the United Kingdom, Edward VII, to speak of the need to settle land claims and Ovide Mercredi, a leader at both the Meech Lake Accord constitutional reform discussions and Oka Crisis.[85][86]The Inuit are the descendants of what anthropologists call the Thule culture, which emerged from western Alaska around 1,000 CE and spread eastward across the Arctic, displacing the Dorset culture (in Inuktitut, the Tuniit). Inuit historically referred to the Tuniit as "giants", or "dwarfs", who were taller and stronger than the Inuit.[87] Researchers hypothesize that the Dorset culture lacked dogs, larger weapons and other technologies used by the expanding Inuit society.[88] By 1300, the Inuit had settled in west Greenland, and finally moved into east Greenland over the following century. The Inuit had trade routes with more southern cultures. Boundary disputes were common and led to aggressive actions.[13]Warfare was common among Inuit groups with sufficient population density. Inuit, such as the Nunatamiut (Uummarmiut) who inhabited the Mackenzie River delta area, often engaged in common warfare. The Central Arctic Inuit lacked the population density to engage in warfare. In the 13th century, the Thule culture began arriving in Greenland from what is now Canada. Norse accounts are scant. Norse-made items from Inuit campsites in Greenland were obtained by either trade or plunder.[89] One account, Ívar Bárðarson, speaks of "small people" with whom the Norsemen fought.[90] 14th-century accounts that a western settlement, one of the two Norse settlements, was taken over by the Skræling.[91]After the disappearance of the Norse colonies in Greenland, the Inuit had no contact with Europeans for at least a century. By the mid-16th century, Basque fishers were already working the Labrador coast and had established whaling stations on land, such as been excavated at Red Bay.[92] The Inuit appear not to have interfered with their operations, but they did raid the stations in winter for tools, and particularly worked iron, which they adapted to native needs.[93]Notable among the Inuit are Abraham Ulrikab and family who became a zoo exhibit in Hamburg, Germany, and Tanya Tagaq, a traditional throat singer.[94] Abe Okpik, CM, was instrumental in helping Inuit obtain surnames rather than disc numbers and Kiviaq (David Ward) won the legal right to use his single-word Inuktituk name.[95][96]The Métis are a people descended from marriages between Europeans (mainly French)[97] and Cree, Ojibway, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Menominee, Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and other First Nations.[12] Their history dates to the mid-17th century.[2] The Métis homeland consists of the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Ontario, as well as the Northwest Territories (NWT).[98]Amongst notable Métis people are television actor Tom Jackson,[99] Commissioner of the Northwest Territories Tony Whitford, and Louis Riel who led two resistance movements: the Red River Rebellion of 1869–1870 and the North-West Rebellion of 1885, which ended in his trial.[100][101][102]The languages inherently Métis are either Métis French or a mixed language called Michif. Michif, Mechif or Métchif is a phonetic spelling of Métif, a variant of Métis.[103] The Métis today predominantly speak English, with French a strong second language, as well as numerous Aboriginal tongues. A 19th-century community of the Métis people, the Anglo-Métis, were referred to as Countryborn. They were children of Rupert's Land fur trade typically of Orcadian, Scottish, or English paternal descent and Aboriginal maternal descent.[104] Their first languages would have been Aboriginal (Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, etc.) and English. Their fathers spoke Gaelic, thus leading to the development of an English dialect referred to as "Bungee".[105]S.35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 mentions the Métis yet there has long been debate over legally defining the term Métis,[106] but on September 23, 2003, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that Métis are a distinct people with significant rights (Powley ruling).[107]From the late 18th century, European Canadians encouraged Aboriginals to assimilate into their own culture, referred to as "Canadian culture".[110][111] These attempts reached a climax in the late 19th and early 20th centuries with forced integration. Because of laws and policies that encouraged or required Aboriginals to assimilate into a Eurocentric society, Canada may have violated the United Nations Genocide Convention that Canada signed in 1949 and passed through Parliament in 1952.[112] The residential school system that removed Aboriginal children from their homes for placement in Christian-run schools has led scholars to believe that Canada can be tried in international court for genocide.[112] A legal case resulted in settlement of 2 Billion C$ in 2006 and the establishment of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission which confirmed the injurious effect on children of this system and turmoil created between aboriginal Canadians and Canadian Society.[113] In 2008 Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued an apology on behalf of the Canadian government and its citizens for the residential school system.[114]The Canadian Crown and Aboriginal peoples began interactions during the European colonialization period. Numbered treaties, the Indian Act, the Constitution Act of 1982 and case laws were established. Aboriginals construe these agreements as being between them and the Crown of Canada through the districts Indian Agent, and not the Cabinet of Canada.[115] The Maori interprets the Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand similarly.[116] A series of eleven treaties were signed between Aboriginals in Canada and the reigning Monarch of Canada from 1871 to 1921. The Government of Canada created the policy, commissioned the Treaty Commissioners and ratified the agreements. These Treaties are agreements with the Government of Canada administered by Canadian Aboriginal law and overseen by the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development.[117]According to the First Nations– Federal Crown Political Accord "cooperation will be a cornerstone for partnership between Canada and First Nations, wherein Canada is the short-form reference to Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.[115] The Supreme Court argued that treaties "served to reconcile pre-existing Aboriginal sovereignty with assumed Crown sovereignty, and to define Aboriginal rights".[115] First Nations people interpreted agreements covered in treaty 8 to last "as long as the sun shines, grass grows and rivers flow."[118]The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples was a Royal Commission undertaken by the Government of Canada in 1991 to address issues of the Aboriginal peoples of Canada.[121] It assessed past government policies toward Aboriginal people, such as residential schools, and provided policy recommendations to the government.[122] The Commission issued its final report in November 1996. The five-volume, 4,000-page report covered a vast range of issues; its 440 recommendations called for sweeping changes to the interaction between Aboriginal, non-Aboriginal people and the governments in Canada.[121] The report "set out a 20-year agenda for change."[123]In 1995, the federal government announced the Aboriginal Right to Self-Government Policy.[124] This policy recognizes that First Nations and Inuit have the constitutional right to shape their own forms of government to suit their particular historical, cultural, political and economic circumstances. The Indian Health Transfer Policy provided a framework for the assumption of control of health services by Aboriginal peoples, and set forth a developmental approach to transfer centred on self-determination in health.[125][126] Through this process, the decision to enter transfer discussions with Health Canada rests with each community. Once involved in transfer, communities can take control of health programme responsibilities at a pace determined by their individual circumstances and health management capabilities.[127] The National Aboriginal Health Organization (NAHO) incorporated in 2000, is an Aboriginal-designed and-controlled not-for-profit body in Canada that works to influence and advance the health and well-being of Aboriginal Peoples.[128]Today's political organizations have resulted from interaction with European-style methods of government through the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians. Aboriginal political organizations throughout Canada vary in political standing, viewpoints, and reasons for forming.[130] First Nations, Métis and Inuit negotiate with the Canadian Government through Indian and Northern Affairs Canada in all affairs concerning land, entitlement, and rights.[129] The First Nation groups that operate independently do not belong to these groups.[129]Countless North American Indigenous words, inventions and games have become an everyday part of Canadian language and use. The canoe, snowshoes, the toboggan, lacrosse, tug of war, maple syrup and tobacco are just a few of the products, inventions and games.[131] Some of the words include the barbecue, caribou, chipmunk, woodchuck, hammock, skunk, and moose.[132] Many places in Canada, both natural features and human habitations, use indigenous names. The word "Canada" itself derives from the St. Lawrence Iroquoian word meaning "village" or "settlement".[133] The province of Saskatchewan derives its name from the Saskatchewan River, which in the Cree language is called "Kisiskatchewani Sipi", meaning "swift-flowing river."[134] Canada's capital city Ottawa comes from the Algonquin language term "adawe" meaning "to trade."[134] Modern youth groups such as Scouts Canada and the Girl Guides of Canada include programs based largely on Indigenous lore, arts and crafts, character building and outdoor camp craft and living.[135]Aboriginal cultural areas depend upon their ancestors' primary lifeway, or occupation, at the time of European contact. These culture areas correspond closely with physical and ecological regions of Canada.[14] The indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast were centred around ocean and river fishing; in the interior of British Columbia, hunter-gatherer and river fishing. In both of these areas the salmon was of chief importance. For the people of the plains, bison hunting was the primary activity. In the subarctic forest, other species such as the moose were more important. For peoples near the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence River, shifting agriculture was practised, including the raising of maize, beans, and squash.[14] While for the Inuit, hunting was the primary source of food with seals the primary component of their diet.[136] The caribou, fish, other marine mammals and to a lesser extent plants, berries and seaweed are part of the Inuit diet. One of the most noticeable symbols of Inuit culture, the inukshuk is the emblem of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. Inuksuit are rock sculptures made by stacking stones; in the shape of a human figure, they are called inunnguaq.[137]Indian reserves, established in Canadian law by treaties such as Treaty 7, are lands of First Nations recognized by non-indigenous governments.[138] Some reserves are within cities, such as the Opawikoscikan Reserve in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Wendake in Quebec City or Stony Plain 135 in the Edmonton Capital Region. There are more reserves in Canada than there are First Nations, which were ceded multiple reserves by treaty.[139] Aboriginal people currently work in a variety of occupations and may live outside their ancestral homes. The traditional cultures of their ancestors, shaped by nature, still exert a strong influence on them, from spirituality to political attitudes.[14] National Aboriginal Day is a day of recognition of the cultures and contributions of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples of Canada. The day was first celebrated in 1996, after it was proclaimed that year, by then Governor General of Canada Roméo LeBlanc, to be celebrated on June 21 annually.[15] Most provincial jurisdictions do not recognize it as a statutory holiday.[15]There are 11 Aboriginal language groups in Canada, made up of more than 65 distinct dialects.[140] Of these, only Cree, Inuktitut and Ojibway have a large enough population of fluent speakers to be considered viable to survive in the long term.[141] Two of Canada's territories give official status to native languages. In Nunavut, Inuktitut and Inuinnaqtun are official languages alongside the national languages of English and French, and Inuktitut is a common vehicular language in territorial government.[142] In the NWT, the Official Languages Act declares that there are eleven different languages: Chipewyan, Cree, English, French, Gwich’in, Inuinnaqtun, Inuktitut, Inuvialuktun, North Slavey, South Slavey and Tlicho.[143] Besides English and French, these languages are not vehicular in government; official status entitles citizens to receive services in them on request and to deal with the government in them.[141]Aboriginals were producing art for thousands of years before the arrival of European settler colonists and the eventual establishment of Canada as a nation state. Like the peoples who produced them, indigenous art traditions spanned territories across North America. Indigenous art traditions are organized by art historians according to cultural, linguistic or regional groups: Northwest Coast, Plateau, Plains, Eastern Woodlands, Subarctic, and Arctic.[144]Art traditions vary enormously amongst and within these diverse groups. Indigenous art with a focus on portability and the body is distinguished from European traditions and its focus on architecture. Indigenous visual art may be used conjunction with other arts. Shamans' masks and rattles are used ceremoniously in dance, storytelling and music.[144] Artworks preserved in museum collections date from the period after European contact and show evidence of the creative adoption and adaptation of European trade goods such as metal and glass beads.[145] The distinct Métis cultures that have arisen from inter-cultural relationships with Europeans contribute culturally hybrid art forms.[146] During the 19th and the first half of the 20th century the Canadian government pursued an active policy of forced and cultural assimilation toward indigenous peoples. The Indian Act banned manifestations of the Sun Dance, the Potlatch, and works of art depicting them.[147]It was not until the 1950s and 1960s that indigenous artists such as Mungo Martin, Bill Reid and Norval Morrisseau began to publicly renew and re-invent indigenous art traditions. Currently there are indigenous artists practising in all media in Canada and two indigenous artists, Edward Poitras and Rebecca Belmore, have represented Canada at the Venice Biennale in 1995 and 2005 respectively.[144]The Aboriginal peoples of Canada encompass diverse ethnic groups with their individual musical traditions. Music is usually social (public) or ceremonial (private). Public, social music may be dance music accompanied by rattles and drums. Private, ceremonial music includes vocal songs with accompaniment on percussion, used to mark occasions like Midewivin ceremonies and Sun Dances.Traditionally, Aboriginal peoples used the materials at hand to make their instruments for centuries before Europeans immigrated to Canada.[148] First Nations people made gourds and animal horns into rattles, which were elaborately carved and brightly painted.[149] In woodland areas, they made horns of birch bark and drumsticks of carved antlers and wood. Traditional percussion instruments such as drums were generally made of carved wood and animal hides. These musical instruments provide the background for songs, and songs the background for dances. Traditional First Nations people consider song and dance to be sacred. For years after Europeans came to Canada, First Nations people were forbidden to practice their ceremonies.[147][148]Approximately 40,115 individuals of Aboriginal heritage could not be counted during the 2006 census.[153][154] This is due to the fact that certain Aboriginal reserves and communities in Canada did not participate in the 2006 census, since enumeration of those communities were not permitted.[153][155] In 2006, 22 Native communities were not completely enumerated unlike in the year 2001, when 30 First Nation communities were not enumerated and during 1996 when 77 Native communities could not be completely enumerated.[153][155] Hence, there were probably 1,212,905 individuals of Aboriginal ancestry (North American Indian, Metis, and Inuit) residing in Canada during the time when the 2006 census was conducted in Canada.The 2011 Canadian Census enumerated 1,400,685 Aboriginal people in Canada, 4.3% of the country's total population.[1] This total comprises 851,560 people of First Nations descent, 451,795 Métis, and 59,445 Inuit. National representative bodies of Aboriginal people in Canada include the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council, the Native Women's Association of Canada, the National Association of Native Friendship Centres and the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples.[152]A microorganism (from the Greek: µ?????, mikros, "small" and ???a??sµ??, organismós, "organism") or microbe is a microscopic organism, which may be a single cell[1] or multicellular organism. The study of microorganisms is called microbiology, a subject that began with Antonie van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of microorganisms in 1675, using a microscope of his own design. On 8 November 2013, scientists reported the discovery of what may be the earliest signs of life on Earth—the oldest complete fossils of a microbial mat (associated with sandstone in Western Australia) estimated to be 3.48 billion years old.[2][3]Microorganisms are very diverse; they include all of the prokaryotes, namely the bacteria and archaea; and various forms of eukaryotes, comprising the protozoa, fungi, algae, microscopic plants (green algae), and animals such as rotifers and planarians. Some microbiologists also classify viruses as microorganisms, but others consider these as nonliving.[4][5] Most microorganisms are microscopic, but there are some like Thiomargarita namibiensis, which are macroscopic and visible to the naked eye.[6]Microorganisms live in every part of the biosphere including soil, hot springs, on the ocean floor, high in the atmosphere and deep inside rocks within the Earth's crust (see also endolith). Microorganisms are crucial to nutrient recycling in ecosystems as they act as decomposers. As some microorganisms can fix nitrogen, they are a vital part of the nitrogen cycle, and recent studies indicate that airborne microbes may play a role in precipitation and weather.[7]On 17 March 2013, researchers reported data that suggested microbial life forms thrive in the Mariana Trench. the deepest spot in the Earth's oceans.[8][9] Other researchers reported related studies that microbes thrive inside rocks up to 1900 feet (580 metres) below the sea floor under 8500 feet (2590 metres) of ocean off the coast of the northwestern United States.[8][10] According to one of the researchers,"You can find microbes everywhere — they're extremely adaptable to conditions, and survive wherever they are."[8]Single-celled microorganisms were the first forms of life to develop on Earth, approximately 3–4 billion years ago.[12][13][14] Further evolution was slow,[15] and for about 3 billion years in the Precambrian eon, all organisms were microscopic.[16] So, for most of the history of life on Earth the only forms of life were microorganisms.[17] Bacteria, algae and fungi have been identified in amber that is 220 million years old, which shows that the morphology of microorganisms has changed little since the Triassic period.[18]Microorganisms tend to have a relatively fast rate of evolution. Most microorganisms can reproduce rapidly, and bacteria are also able to freely exchange genes through conjugation, transformation and transduction, even between widely divergent species.[19] This horizontal gene transfer, coupled with a high mutation rate and many other means of genetic variation, allows microorganisms to swiftly evolve (via natural selection) to survive in new environments and respond to environmental stresses. This rapid evolution is important in medicine, as it has led to the recent development of "super-bugs", pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to modern antibiotics.[20]The possibility that microorganisms exist was discussed for many centuries before their discovery in the 17th century. The existence of unseen microbiological life was postulated by Jainism, which is based on Mahavira's teachings as early as 6th century BCE.[21] Paul Dundas notes that Mahavira asserted the existence of unseen microbiological creatures living in earth, water, air and fire.[22] The Jain scriptures also describe nigodas, which are sub-microscopic creatures living in large clusters and having a very short life, which are s swamps:

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